Recent events in Baltimore have created a dark domino effect throughout our nation. However, not every consequence as a result has been negative. The situation has sparked Sacramento ACT’s interest in eliminating ethnic bias, training our law enforcement in racial tolerance, and expanding alternatives to incarceration.

Nationwide, African-Americans represent 26% of juvenile arrests, 44% of youth who are detained, 46% of the youth who are judicially waived to criminal court, and 58% of the youth admitted to state prisons (Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice).

Nationwide, African-Americans represent 26% of juvenile arrests, 44% of youth who are detained, and 58% of the youth admitted to state prisons (dosomething.org).

On Tuesday, May 19th, Sacramento ACT will host a free, live Community Forum with the Board of State and Community Corrections to discuss the racial issues that effect our area. Doors will open at 6 pm at the South Sacramento Christian Center, located at 7710 Stockton Boulevard. The public is encouraged be a part of the conversation.

In addition to opening the doors to new ideas concerning the ethnic bias issues in Sacramento, the discussion will address the mental health needs in our communities. Among the attendants will be the State Board of Community Corrections, youth speakers, a representative from Sac PD, and Supervisor Patrick Kennedy.

The event will also include youth spoken word and a special live performance from rapper and community activist Sevin.

“Events like this are becoming more and more necessary,” says Berkeley Gamblin, a freshman from Foothill High school who has already witnessed some racial bias in her community, “I think that better training of our law enforcement will help the situation.”

According to the criminal justice fact sheet at naacp.org, one in six African American men were incarcerated in 2001. If the trend were to continue, it is expected that one in every three African American men can expect to be sent to prison during his lifetime today.

Many would agree that America today is facing a scary problem concerning bias and incarceration of youths. Hopefully, starting a conversation about these issues will educate our community and keep the same issues that are occurring in Baltimore from effecting our own city.

For more information, you can check out the event’s facebook page, here, or email Danielle Williams at danielle@sacact.org