Long time free-speech and diversity public access cable TV broadcaster Access Sacramento will add  a new Low-Power FM (LPFM) radio station to its outreach later this year.

Radio programmers work from two radio production and broadcast studios at Access Sacramento inside the Coloma Community Center.

Radio programmers work from two radio production and broadcast studios at Access Sacramento inside the Coloma Community Center.

The  Federal Communications Commission (FCC) granted a license and construction permit Friday for  non-commercial non-profit Access Sacramento to operate on frequency 96.5 FM.

“This will be such an important opportunity for our radio producers to be heard by an even larger audience,” said JoAnn Fuller, Access Sacramento’s Chair of the Board of Directors.  “For more than two decades we’ve been heard on cable radio or the website, but now here’s a way for an even greater connection to the community.”

LPFM station applications were accepted by the FCC last November after a call by Congress to the FCC to provide more hyper-local community content.

Listen to Access Sacramento’s “The Voice” HERE.

“Access Sacramento’s television public access content has always promoted local programs,” said Gary Martin, Access Sacramento Executive Director. “Now our radio programmers’ music, talk, public affairs and election information that will be heard in cars all over Sacramento.”

Access Sacramento already operates cable television channels 17 and 18 on Comcast and SureWest Cable and can be seen on Channel 99 on AT&T U-verse, with audio streaming on cable radio, the Second Audio Program (SAP) and the Internet.

The station will operate from the radio studios housed in the Access Sacramento offices at the Coloma Community Center in East Sacramento.  The transmitter and antenna will be positioned in midtown off the top of a six story office complex.

The low-power station will be hear from approximately Sleep Train Arena in the north to Florin Road in the South, and in the east from about Cal State, Sacramento through West Sacramento.

Access Sacramento would use the top of an existing mast in downtown Sacramento for its antenna.

Access Sacramento would use the top of an existing mast in downtown Sacramento for its antenna.

“We have 18 months to get the transmitter up and operating,” said Shane Carpenter, Access Sacramento’s radio coordinator.  “There is so much extra energy about Access Sacramento right now.  Our radio announcers are hoping for big things: more remotes from downtown, more election and candidate discussion, and maybe even a chance to broadcast city council meetings.”

Access Sacramento is just one of 13 LPFM applications filed for the Sacramento area. Two applications have been dismissed, and one other application was granted a week ago:  The Williams Memorial Church of God in Christ was approved for FM 99.1 Mhz. Three applications have been “Accepted for Filing” which means all of the engineering is correct and a license is very likely.  Six other application have been ‘received’ but many of these applied for identical frequencies and they’re negotiating to determine if partnerships can be built before the FCC acts.